Convenient Seasons and Why the MCU Doesn’t Get Props for LGBTQ “Diversity”

Over on Black Girl Nerds I explain why the Marvel Cinematic Universe doesn’t deserve praise for diversity. At least not yet anyway.

And now, our feature presentation.

The Nerds Of Color: Political Engagement In And Through A Racialized Fandom Space

My time as a contributor to the Nerds of Color was definitely a blessed one. The story of how I was recruited is a story in itself. From a professional standpoint, being a contributor led to some excellent opportunities. Everything from networking, to receiving gigs, projects and other opportunities. More than that I gained some amazing friends. For all of that I am truly appreciative.

One specific highlight was when myself, N.O.C. Founder and Publisher Keith Chow, several other N.O.C. colleagues as well as Black Girl Nerds Founder and Publisher Jamie Broadnax were interviewed by Ama Uytingco for a research paper she penned for a class at New York University.

To say I was honored and humbled to be interviewed would be a major understatement. But more than that, this paper reminded me that speaking truth to power can have a  ripple effect in unimaginable ways as well as make an impact.

6338903-9027335934-giphy

Continue reading “The Nerds Of Color: Political Engagement In And Through A Racialized Fandom Space”

The Revolution and Evolution of Women’s Wrestling Is Just Getting Started

March may be over but Women’s HERstory continues to be written.

Over on Black Girl Nerds I discuss the latest renaissance in Women’s Wrestling and share how Hall of Famer Gail Kim and the other Knockouts of Impact Wrestling threw down the gauntlet in raising the standard of excellence which in turn has resulted in the WWE, NWA, and AEW and the rest of the industry responding in kind.

Screen-Shot-2019-04-15-at-2.32.38-PM

 

Let’s get into it.

More Moments In Whitewashed History

Say what you will about the 2000 teen comedy film, Bring It On, its commentary on cultural appropriation, racism, privilege, white supremacy, and the exploitation of Black culture seems to be more relevant now than when the film was released nearly two decades ago.

Over on Black Girl Nerds, I give five more examples of Black Excellence Erasure.

Let’s get into it.